Eos

the lamp created with the barrels used to age Barolo

Eos the lamp created with the barrels used to age Barolo
The prototype won the first edition of ReWineD®, a project by Josetta Saffirio of Monforte d’Alba, in partnership with the students of the Istituto Europeo di Design in Turin and Italia Bellissima, to create design objects with waste from the wine cellar.

It’s called “Eos” and it’s a lamp made with the staves of barrels used to age Barolo. At the moment it’s just a prototype but it could soon be put into production. The young women behind its concept and creation are Anna Bellezza and Giulia Catalani, two second-year students of the Product Design Course of the European Institute of Design in Turin (IED). The project won the ReWineD® (Recycled Wine Design) scholarship, launched by young winemaker Sara Vezza, owner of the Josetta Saffirio winery in Monforte d’Alba, as the prize for the winner of a challenge set for the students of the IED: to produce design objects by recycling the waste from her wine cellar. So glass bottles, used corks, old barrels, wooden cases, cardboard boxes and rolls of labels were given a second life by the four projects that competed: the Eos lamp was joined by “Wine Oak”, a multipurpose corkscrew and penknife for wine created by Elena Bellacicco and Federica Ferrarese; “La vite è bella”, a chopping board made with wood from disused barrels created by Paolo Conte, Margherita Fruscoloni Morello and Silvio Positano; and “Between the stripes”, an ice bucket made with corks designed by Cecilia Clot and Lorenzo Puglisi.

The most beautiful and functional project was decided by a female jury made up of young wine producer Violante Gardini (Prime Donne Donatella Cinelli Colombini), architect and journalist Giovanna Crespi and architect Maria Grazia Novo. The award ceremony took place in the winery in Monforte, with a day of celebration and discussion, presented by journalist Maria Bianucci. The mayor of Monforte, Livio Genesio, was also present.

“The kids have been very receptive” says Sara Vezza “and have shown that recycling the waste from the cellar and production is possible, giving it a new life. Here in the cellar even leftovers are very precious because there are very few of them: the idea of recycling them and not throwing them away shows consumers that we pay attention to even the tiniest details. Recycling concludes a journey of sustainability that our company embarked upon in 2004 when we decided to go organic”.

“The kids have been very receptive” says Sara Vezza “and have shown that recycling the waste from the cellar and production is possible, giving it a new life. Here in the cellar even leftovers are very precious because there are very few of them: the idea of recycling them and not throwing them away shows consumers that we pay attention to even the tiniest details. Recycling concludes a journey of sustainability that our company embarked upon in 2004 when we decided to go organic”.

The job lasted the whole school year, with numerous meetings with students in the vineyards of the Langhe and at the Institute. Local alliances have been created and Italia Bellissima, a network of Italian architects and craftsmen working in the building and decoration sector, created by the Asti architect Andrea Capellino, joined the partnership. “We put together all the ancient Italian crafting techniques and present them in a modern version” explains Capellino “and we are very interested in the subject of recycling and environmental sustainability: what we call systemic design is now a necessity that arises from the excess of production waste that is still full of value and life”.

The IED students were supervised by professor Giorgio Ceste and coordinated by Simone Peditto (IED Design didactic coordination): “This is a project that combines three concepts: craftsmanship, environmental sustainability and experimentation. It is a return to material, to reality: during this course the students got their hands dirty and worked with waste materials that come from the wine production cycle. Waste products that have been given a second life”.

by Fabrizio Aimar